Working Together To Find Solutions To The Water Scarcity Issues

tailored Water Conservation 0 Comment

“We never know the worth of water, until it runs out,” Thomas Fuller.

Water is everyone’s business and demand for water is outstripping supply. Urbanisation is resulting in increased pressure on ageing municipal infrastructure. Industrial development requires access to reliable water supply. Pollution of valuable drinking water sources is resulting in deteriorating raw water quality and compromising life sustaining ecosystems.

Bringing resources and key players together to network, share and work together to find solutions to the water scarcity issues South Africa is facing, WISA2020 from 7 – 11 December, will be a completely virtual event. Click here to register and visit the SBS® Virtual Exhibition booth and let’s partner to find solutions to your agricultural, mining, fire safety water storage and water reservoir requirements.

Climate change is also impacting water supply and dam levels, increasing the risk of fires, droughts, and even floods. Droughts are negatively impacting the agricultural sector, resulting in increased need for water storage reservoirs and water storage dams to supply water for crop and herd survival and prevent food scarcity. Floods will result in loss of life and damage to crops, water storage dams and sanitation infrastructure.

In South Africa, our Constitution states that everyone has a right to access to sufficient water. And while access to water and sanitation during democracy has improved dramatically, the remote rural areas and rapidly growing informal settlements remain under-serviced. According to the WWF Water Facts and Futures Report², South Africa has ground-breaking legislation that recognises the importance of the whole water cycle and grants the environment and people a basic right to water. The report asserts that we need to think about water provision differently in remote rural locations, using decentralised systems and point-of-use household treatment technologies to make sure the water is safe to drink.

Modular water storage reservoirs and water storage tanks provide a viable solution to the needs in these communities, as well as to the industrial, mining, agricultural and domestic developmental sectors beset with the challenges of failing or non-existent water infrastructure and unpredictable climate change. Utilising technologically advanced systems that can maximise site usage, building up instead of outwards, harvesting rainwater, reducing or eliminating the dumping of water that can be recycled and safe for reuse and providing back-up water storage facilities will enhance water-use efficiencies, help to address water scarcity, improving access to reliable, safe potable water and ensuring operational continuity in times of supply disruption.

With a proven track record of over 20-years in the water storage tank industry, SBS® seeks to improve the equitable access for all to safe, clean drinking water and provide solutions for the rural, domestic housing, agricultural, mining and urban industrial sectors. Providing safe, cost-effective, modular water tank storage systems, with a 65-year lifespan and working to install rainwater harvesting, potable or waste-water reservoirs no matter how remote the location, how small or large the project, SBS offers a premium water storage solution, partnering with clients to find solutions to their specific project requirements.

WISA2020 provides a platform to look for ways to reduce water demand and increase supply, manage the resource for a capable ecology, manage and monitor effective water and sanitation services and infrastructure, govern and regulate the sector while improving raw water quality and management and develop skills and technology innovations and disruptors. We need #AllHandsOnDeck.

Register to visit the virtual SBS® stand at WISA2020 and chat to us to find a solution to your water storage requirements or visit www.sbstanks.com

Sources:

²//awsassets.wwf.org.za/downloads/wwf009_waterfactsandfutures_report_web__lowres_.pdf